Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Vocabulario. Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando entradas con la etiqueta Vocabulario. Mostrar todas las entradas
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La palabra “amor” escrita en las 24 lenguas oficiales de la Unión Europea

La palabra “amor” viene del latín. Traducida en varios idiomas, dicha palabra tiene el mismo significado aunque su origen etimológico, su ortografía y su pronunciación difieran.     





Pon a prueba tus conocimientos o tu intuición con el siguiente test. Relaciona las palabras de la columna de la izquierda con el idioma correspondiente de la columna de la derecha.   
      
1
amar
a
2
amor
b
3
amore
c
4
amour
d
5
armastus
e
6
dragoste
f
7
grá
g
8
imħabba
h
9
kærlighed
i
10
kärlek
j
11
láska
k
12
láska
l
13
Liebe
m
14
liefde
n
15
ljubav
o
16
ljubezen
p
17
love
q
18
meilė
r
19
mīlestība
s
20
miłość
t
21
rakkaus
u
22
szerelem
v
23
αγάπη
w
24
любов
x



Comprueba tus resultados con la solución aquí debajo.
1m – 2x – 3k – 4o – 5i – 6l – 7p – 8b – 9e – 10u – 11d – 12w - 13v – 14q – 15g – 16c- 17s- 18r- 19h- 20n- 21t – 22a-23f-24j
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"Like lovebirds"

Los españoles somos muy del uso de frases coloquiales tales como "Se me ha ido el santo al cielo", "Esto está donde Cristo perdió la zapatilla", etc... pero ¿sabemos como podríamos expresarlas en Ingles?.

Aquí os vamos a dejaros unas que posiblemente causen sensación en vuestras conversaciones:

1. Más vale tarde que nunca: “Better late than never
2. Me importa un bledo/un comino: “I don’t care” o, más fuerte, “I don’t give a shit”.
3. Meter la pata: “Mess up/screw up”.
4. Se me ha ido el santo al cielo: “It totally slipped my mind/I completely forgot
5. Darse el piro: To take off, to bail, to jump, to Bounce.
6. Feliz como una perdiz: “As happy as a clam”.
7. Menos da una piedra: “Like squeezing blood from a stone”.
8. Más vale pájaro en mano que ciento volando: “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush”.
9. Hacerse el sueco: “To blow somebody off”.
10. Irse a la francesa: “To sneak out without a peep/without so much as a word”.
11. Esto está donde Cristo perdió la zapatilla: “This is in the boonies”.
12. Tener más cuento que Calleja: “To be a drama queen/to be more trouble than your worth”.
13. Irse por los cerros de Úbeda: To get sidetracked, to go off on a tangent (irse por la tangente en este caso).
14. Quedarse a cuadros: Be gobsmacked (muy de Reino Unido); my jaw dropped.
15. Ya saldrá el sol por Antequera: What will be will be.
16. Gastar menos que las vías del tren o ser de la Hermandad del puño cerrado: To be tight-fisted, to be a penny-pincher.
17. Faltar un hervor: Not the sharpest knife in the drawer, not the sharpest tool in the shed.
18. Caer en saco roto: To fall on deaf ears.
19. Hacerse el sordo: To give somebody the cold shoulder.
20. Tomar el pelo: To pull somebody’s leg.
21. Ser más lento que el caballo del Malo: To be slower than molasses.


Y la especial la que podréis usar el próximo día 14 de Febrero, día de los enamorados:

Enamorados como tortolitos:"Like lovebirds"


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There were three of us



“There were three of us”

When telling a story or describing something, it’s quite common to have to talk about the number of people or things at any place in time.  In English we have a rather precise way to do this, so today we’re going to shed some light on this strange construction.  The sentence: “There were three of us,” means Éramos tres and many Spanish speakers have the tendency to say, “We were three”—but that’s incorrect! In English, if we want to express the idea of how many people or things were at a certain event/involved in a situation, we need to use:

·         The verb there is/there are OR it +to be (these can be conjugated in the past, present or future, depending on the situation)
·         The number of people or things
·         "of"
·         The accusative form of the personal pronoun (us, you, them).  Remember, since we’re counting, we’re only going to be using plural pronouns.

This little formula should be helpful but let’s look at some examples to make sure it’s clear.

How many books were there in your bag?
There were four of them.

How many students are there in your class?
There are 31 of us.

How many of us are going to participate in the concert?
I’m not; I think it will be just the two of you.

Obviously you could respond to these questions in other ways: “There were four books in your bag”; “there are 31 students in my class”; or “only you two will participate in the concert”.  However, this construction is a great way to show your domination of one of the intricacies of the English language, so try it out!

Here are a few examples to practice on (feel free to make up the answers):

·         How many people are in your family?
·         How many books are on your bookshelf?
·         How many employees are there in your job?
·         How many people were in that restaurant?
·         How many balls are on the field? 


Abigail Franckquepohl | 121 Conversation
Autora: Abigail Franckquepohl
Profesora en 121 Conversation. Nacida en Nueva York, se ha trasladado a España para conocer otra cultura y otro idioma. Es profesora acreditada con el TEFL y lleva cinco años dando clases de inglés para extranjeros.
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Fitting prepositions into your busy schedule

Fortunately or unfortunately, we have to admit that time rules our life.  We’re constantly scheduling things, marking our calendars, making sure we leave on time to get to the next activity—let’s face it, we’re slaves to the clock!  And so, you can move to a nice a little cabin in the woods and use the sun as your only form to measure time or you can accept your fate and learn how to talk about time terms in English.  Sorry guys, today we’ll have to go with the latter.

TIME:

  • AT-When discussing time we use the preposition at.


Ex: My ballet lesson is at 3:00 (three o’clock).
        We’re going to the theater at 7:00pm. (at 7pm).

It’s also important to remember that when asking questions about time, we can you “what time is” OR “when”.

Ex: What time is your soccer practice? It’s at 4:30 (four thirty).
        When do you have your dentist appointment?  It’s at 10:45 (ten forty five).

We use “am” and “pm” in spoken English when it’s not clear if we’re talking about the morning or evening, or if we want to emphasize an exact time.

Ex: The business meeting begins at 10am. = (at 10am sharp!)
       I start work at 8pm; it’s the night shift.

DAYS and DATES:

  • ON-When we talk about days of the weeks or specific dates, we use the preposition on.

Calendar | Blog 121 Conversation

Ex:  I have English classes on Mondays and Wednesdays.
         My birthday is on December 3rd. OR My birthday is on the third of December.

Remember, we do use an article (the) with dates but we DON’T with days of the week.

Ex: I’ve got a date on Friday. –If we want to be specific we can say “this” but NEVER “the”.
       I’ve got a date this Friday.
       He’s going on vacation this Saturday.

MONTHS and YEARS:

  • IN-When we’re talking about months and years, we use the preposition in.


Ex: I have a huge project due in January.
       When did you get married? We got married in 1984.

So, until you find yourself living on the beach without a care in the world, make sure you use the right preposition when talking about time!



Abigail Franckquepohl | 121 Conversation
Autora: Abigail Franckquepohl
Profesora en 121 Conversation. Nacida en Nueva York, se ha trasladado a España para conocer otra cultura y otro idioma. Es profesora acreditada con el TEFL y lleva cinco años dando clases de inglés para extranjeros.
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False Friends

False Friends | 121 ConversationIsn’t that the worst feeling when one of your friends disappoints you?  Or even worse, when they betray you? It’s like you’re stabbed right through the heart.  Well, words are the same, although hopefully it doesn’t hurt quite so much.  False cognates, more colloquially known as “false friends,” are words in two languages that look the same but don’t have the same meaning.  They can really deceive you, those little tricksters. 

Some words in English and Spanish are spelled exactly the same way and have the same meaning, take chocolate--the only difference is the pronunciation. Animal, legal, taxi, video and sofa are some more examples.  Other words look very similar and have the same meaning like apartment-apartamento, contact-contacto, elegant-elegante, dialogue-diálogo, band-banda and many more.  However, those aren’t the crux
of our problem.  What we’re going to focus on today are words that look the same but have totally different meanings—the false cognates or infamous “false friends.” Here are 15 of the most common false friend mistakes for Spanish speakers.
False Friends | 121 Conversation

Spanish term
English definition
English false friend
Spanish translation
Actual
Current
Actual
Real, existente
Asistir
Attend
Assist
ayudar
Carpeta
Folder
Carpet
alfombra
Constipación
A cold, stuffed up
Constipation
Estreñimiento
Decepción
Disappointment
Deception
Engaño
Éxito
Success
Exit
Salida
Embarazado
Pregnant
Embarassed
Avergonzada
Fábrica
Factory
Fabric
Tela, tejido
Idioma
Language
Idiom
Modismo, frase hecha
Noticia
News
Notice
Aviso/Notar
Remover
Stir
Remove
Quitar, sacar
Reunión
Meeting
Reunion
Reencuentro/Reunión
Sensible
Sensitive
Sensible
Sensato
Sopa
Soup
Soap
Jabón
Soportar
To put up with
Support
Apoyar

 Here are some examples of these false friends in use-hopefully they help you remember the difference.

Image courtesy of Ambro at FreeDigitalPhotos.net |121 Conversation
1. I eat carrot soup everyday but I wash myself with soap.
2. I stuffed my papers in my folder and put it down on the carpet.
3. Actually, I’m really interested in current events.
4. I was so embarrassed that I asked that a woman if she were pregnant-it turns out she was just fat!
5. What a beautiful fabric! Yes, it was made in a factory.


Homework! 

Now it’s your turn.  Watch out because these are difficult. Each sentence contains a false friend error. Try to spot the false friend and replace it with the correct word in English.

1. When you make a sauce, remove it slowly.
2. English is an easy idiom to learn.
3. It was a good notice - Sheila had twins.
4. The film was a great exit - it won 8 Oscars.
5. He put the papers inside the carpet.
6. They have a reunion every morning at 10am.

Abigail Franckquepohl | 121 Conversation
Autora: Abigail Franckquepohl
Profesora en 121 Conversation. Nacida en Nueva York, se ha trasladado a España para conocer otra cultura y otro idioma. Es profesora acreditada con el TEFL y lleva cinco años dando clases de inglés para extranjeros.
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Ship or Sheep: The Eternal Pronunciation Dilemma

Correct pronunciation is a bit of a dilemma in any new language. There are new consonant combinations, vowels with more than one sound and maybe even a strange nasalized noise. Sometimes you’re delighted to find out that a letter sounds just the same in a new language as in your language. However, when this isn’t the case progress can be difficult and a mistake might be detrimental.


In English, the long e and the short i sounds are a constant source of struggle and jokes for Spanish-speakers. You know you’re stuck at a linguistic impasse if you are scared to talk to native speakers about going to the beach or to ask them for a sheet of paper. So, let’s try to get it straight. 

The short i is the vowel sound in the word sit. The long e is the vowel sound in the word keep. The tongue needs to be dropped a little lower and farther back in the mouth to produce the short i sound. Relaxing your tongue a bit may help. The tongue needs to be spread out flat to pronounce the long e.

It’s also a great idea to look in the mirror. To make the long e sound you have to smile J but to make the short i, your mouth should be slightly opened, not smiling.
           
Try saying these word pairs aloud while looking in the mirror. Look at the diagram for guidance: the short i sound should come from the back of your mouth and your tongue should be raised higher than for the long e sound.

dip / deep
grin / green
lick / leak
ship / sheep
bit / beat


Diagram | 121 Conversation


Keep practicing, don’t be shy and don’t give up!





I prefer to sit in the passenger's seat.
I prefer to sit in the passenger's seat.
We need to fill this position as soon as possible.
I feel like a complete idiot.
The ship should arrive on December 6.
The sheep mainly eat grass.
Sheep often live on hills and mountains.
His lack of honesty is his Achilles' heel.
That table does not fit in the small room.
A long time ago, people had to use their own feet to measure things.
Paul lives on the first floor.
Why do leaves change color in the fall?


Abigail Franckquepohl | 121 Conversation
Autora: Abigail Franckquepohl
Profesora en 121 Conversation. Nacida en Nueva York, se ha trasladado a España para conocer otra cultura y otro idioma. Es profesora acreditada con el TEFL y lleva cinco años dando clases de inglés para extranjeros.